Everything you need to know about human rights in Argentina Amnesty International Amnesty International

But the new freedoms have not extended to women charged with homicide for undergoing what lawyers and supporters claim are actually miscarriages, stillbirths, or other complications. The same study found at least 37 women had faced charges – either for homicide, or abandonment of a person – for possible obstetric events. The Centre of Legal and Social Studies in Buenos Aires said poor, migrant women are more likely to face prosecution.

  • A mother holds her daughter as she prepares to take her to day care, in Argentina, on April 15, 2009.
  • In 2010, Argentina became the first Latin American country to legalize same-sex marriage.
  • Free with trial Young woman drinking traditional Argentinian yerba mate tea.
  • Her admiration for the independent, “pioneer” spirit among the local population comes through in her voice, especially when she talks about those who came here when the province was still a territory.
  • Women from the “Ni Una Menos” or “Not One Less” movement marched to protest what they say is the negligence of judges when it comes to taking measures against aggressors of women.

“Now comes a moment of feminist pedagogy about this right to be able to speak about and explain to as many people as possible that this is a right that we have and that we are citizens who can make our own decisions about our bodies.” In 2018, the #NiUnaMenos movement transitioned into the Green Wave demonstrations, which https://hamdanacademy.org/2022/12/26/mail-order-bride-wikipedia/ call for legal and safe access to abortions in Latin America. Years later, “this massive mobilization was also able to draw attention to another longstanding fight which was reproductive health and rights,” Ximena Casas tells NPR. She is an Americas Researcher for the women’s rights division at Human Rights Watch in Madrid. Her death, along with https://absolute-woman.com/latin-women/argentinian-women/ other similar high-profile murders of young women in Argentina at the time, was a breaking point for women there. Six years on, the work of #NiUnaMenos activists in Latin America continues Ni Una Menos, or Not One Less, started out in Argentina as a slogan chanted by thousands protesting the murders of young women.

In Argentina, divorce was legalized only in 1987, and the legalization was the result of a struggle between different governments and conservative groups, mostly connected to the Catholic Church, that lasted a whole century. In 1987, President Raúl Alfonsín was successful in passing the divorce law, following a ruling of the Supreme Court.

Violence against women and girls

This limits a woman´s autonomy, which is often a key factor in situations where violence emerges,” continues Cari. While individual prostitution is legal in Argentina, the promotion, facilitation, or forcing of people into prostitution is illegal.

The Argentine quota law signed by President Carlos Menem in 1991 provides that one-third of the members of both houses of congress must be women, a goal achieved through balanced election slates. As of 2006, there were 29 women in the 72-seat Senate, 86 women in the 257-seat Argentine Chamber of Deputies, two female Supreme Court justices, and three women in the presidential cabinet. The President of Argentina, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner was elected in 2007; the runner-up in the crowded field was also a woman, Elisa Carrió. While most economists will be more satisfied with a promise of higher productivity, many Argentinian women are aiming for gender equality. “In order to talk about autonomy over our bodies, we need to have economic autonomy,”said Mercedes D’Alessandro, the newly appointed national director for gender and economics, who has close ties with the Argentinian feminists.

Argentina

The new law also provided for gender equality between the wife and husband. By 1987, when divorce was legalized, only three other Latin American countries prohibited divorce (Paraguay and Colombia, which legalized it 1991, and Chile which legalized it in 2004). Also, a new Civil and Commercial https://www.sabredenkadinlar.com/2023/01/25/chinese-dating-why-eharmony-makes-your-dating-journey-a-success/ Code, modernizing family law, came into force in August 2015. Following President Juan Perón’s enactment of women’s suffrage in 1949, First Lady Evita Perón led the Peronist Women’s Party until her death in 1952, and helped enhance the role of women in Argentine society.

The latest available data from the National Registry of Femicides, administered by the Supreme Court, reported 251 femicides—the murder of women based on their gender—and only four convictions, in 2020. With regard to the organization of family life, Argentina has a history of social conservatism, and the influence of Catholicism in Argentina has been very strong throughout the 20th century.

“In the past, regions such as North America and Europe have been at the forefront of movements to expand sexual and reproductive rights,” Mariela Belski, the executive director for Amnesty International Argentina, told NPR. “However, it is currently the trans feminist movements in Latin America that are advancing discussions that place reproductive autonomy and gender justice at center stage.” The new administration of President Alberto Fernández is signaling that it wants to meet the movement’s expectations.

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